Multi-Level Politics and Europe: Regional Attitudes towards the rotating presidency after Lisbon

Publicado el 19 de enero de 2011 a las 00h. y 00m. por Charo Llera en General

Reykjavik during the ECPR General Conference (25-27 August 2011) 

 

Submit their paper through MyECPR by 1st February 2011.

 

The link to the paper proposal:

http://www.ecprnet.eu/conferences/general_conference/Reykjavik/documents/Paper_Proposal_Guidelines_and_Deadlines.pdf

 

Panel details and abstract:

http://www.ecprnet.eu/conferences/general_conference/Reykjavik/panel_details.asp?panelid=65

Section ID: 43

Section Title: Themes and Challenges to Multi-Level and Regional Politics

Panel: Multi-Level Politics and Europe: Regional Attitudes towards the rotating presidency after Lisbon

Panel Chair(s)

Name: Jorge  Tuñón  (jorgetn@gmail.com) - Panel Chair.

Institution: CARLOS III de Madrid, Universidad

 

Name: Regis  Dandoy  (rdandoy@ulb.ac.be) - Panel Co-Chair

Institution: Université Libre de BRUXELLES

Panel Discussant 

Name: Simone  Bunse  (msbgsox@georgetown.edu)

Institution: GEORGETOWN University

Panel Abstract

The regions have a significant impact on the policies of the EU and are nowadays more and more included in the daily decision-making processes of the EU. The system of the rotating presidencies is in this regard another opportunity for the regions to exert some influence on the European (and in some extent national) policies. This panel intends to gather papers around the neglected analysis of the contributions of the regions to the various tasks, events and issues related to the presidencies of the European Union. The presidency constitutes also for some regions from federal or highly decentralised states a unique opportunity to put their specific issues on the political agenda and prioritize some domestic and regional issues at the EU level. The analysis of the various positions, means and repertoires of actions and even the coalition of (regional) actors can also teach us about the role played by the regional actors in today's EU policies. Paper proposals dealing with comparative across regions or countries but case studies are welcome.